Overtaken or working through?

Last week I wrote about how my professional and personal worlds are colliding now that I’ve started working for a project that advocates for kids (of all kinds, but especially with special needs) and their families in healthcare reform.

Sitting down to my journal this morning, I flipped back through the past few weeks and noticed that Disability — as both theoretical concept and a pragmatic reality — hasn’t just seeped into every corner of my life: it’s pushing out nearly everything else. It’s filling not just the huge blocks of time I think of as “work time” and “family time,” but even the small slivers of time in between, not just the thoughts but the space between the thoughts, permeating my consciousness from the moment I start journaling at 5am to the last few moments of each day I spend reading every night. (The book right now is required reading on the evolution of disability rights, I kid you not.) The many, many moments in between  —  checking email, talking to friends (often also parents of kids with special needs), planning for the future, running errands and making calls (picking up meds and scheduling specialist appointments) leave little time for other things.

The irony is not lost on me. In the process of trying to build a life unimpeded by the limits of disability, it looks as though it is taking over like a kudzu vine. In an effort to move beyond disability by becoming empowered by it, I have become ensnared.

It’s cause for concern. This level of immersion in the stories of others and their challenges leads to a sort of vicarious trauma that will surely lead to burnout. And surely no one feels like hanging around a walking protest sign. At moments I bore myself.

And yet… (yes, there’s always an “and yet….”) it strikes me that the seeming claustrophobia that Disability is playing in my life right now is in fact a cocoon; there’s no way for me to metamorphosize to the butterfly-hood that is a joyful, inclusive, authentic life without being held completely captive by this for a little while. In my struggle to break free, my wings grow stronger and eventually, when the threads of the chrysalis release me, I will be something completely different than I was before.

At least, that’s what I hope.

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“Let there be peace, welfare and righteousness”

Martin Luther King leaning on a lectern. Deuts...
Image via Wikipedia

Reflecting on Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.‘s contribution to peace  thought I’d share a blessing by Hagen Hasselbalch which I found in Earth Prayers. It so beautifully captures the open-armed ambitions of the peace movement inspired by folks like Dr. King: the desire for justice, for access, for respect for each other and the earth.

Let there be peace, welfare and righteousness
in every part of the world.
 
Let confidence and friendship prevail
for the good of east and west
for the good of the needy south
for the good of all humanity.
 
Let the people inspire their leaders
helping them to seek peace by peaceful means
helping them and urging them
to build a better world
a world with a home for everybody
a world with food and work for everybody
a world with spiritual freedom
for everybody.
 
Let those who have the power of money
be motivated by selfless compassion.
Let money become a tool
for the good of humankind.
 
Let those who have power
deal respectfully with the resources of the planet.
Let them respect and maintain
the purity of the air, water, land and subsoil.
Let them co-operate to restore
the ecological soundness of Mother Earth.
 
Let trees grow up by the billions
around the world.
Let green life invade the deserts.
 
Let industry serve humanity
and produce waste that serves nature.
 
Let technology respect
the holiness of Mother Earth.
 
Let those who control the mass media
contribute to create mutual understanding
contribute to create optimism and confidence.
 
Let ordinary people
meet by the millions across the borders.
Let them create a universal network
of love and friendship.
 
Let billions of human beings
co-operate to create a good future
for their children and grandchildren.
 
Let us survive
In peace and harmony with Mother Earth.

Peace.

No big whoop?

The special needs blogosphere and social media outlets are abuzz about this recent Target ad featuring a boy with Down Syndrome. This kid is cute. Really cute. It’s great to see him there.

The big news isn’t the fact that he’s in the shot; what people seem to be focusing on is the fact that Target didn’t make a big deal about it.

I wonder, though, how they could have “made a big deal” if they wanted to. Send out press releases? Add a little arrow pointing to him with a label, “Check it out, we’re really cool”? I don’t think so. They didn’t make a big deal about it because simply including him is a big deal. Enough said.

I don’t mean to sound cynical. I am glad to see all kinds of people portrayed in media, there not because they’re a token representing a particular slice of the market, but because they’re just there. And if it gets folks talking about and encouraging true inclusion (like this great post by Shannon Dingle about the ad and creating inclusive religious communities), then I’m definitely satisfied.

We can celebrate this milestone. But let’s not say that we’re done, OK?

Here’s how we’ll know when we’re done: when all children are included, not only in photo shoots but in schools and communities and in real lives all around the world, when no one makes a big deal about it, and no one needs to point out that we didn’t make a big deal about it.